Events

Austin Society for Psychoanalytic Psychology Monthly Meetings



All monthly meetings will be meeting in the auditorium in the Austin Energy Building at 721 Barton Springs Road, across the street from the Long Center. Our first meeting of the year will be September 7th from 7:15 to 9:00 p.m. Thereafter, we’ll meet on the first Wednesday of the month from October through May.

 Salons

Our salons are friendly gatherings at the homes and offices of members of ASPP that intend to promote psychoanalytically and psychodynamically oriented knowledge at both beginning and advanced levels. The fees are aimed to support these and other ASPP programs. Our theme this year is Conflict, Enactments and Resolution.


Click here for full descriptions and registration forms.

 

Conference/ Workshop Cancellation Policy

A full refund minus $25 administration fee will be issued for all cancellation requests received one week prior to day of the conference or workshop. No refunds will be issued after that time.

All requests must be in writing. Send email to info@asppaustin.org.


Upcoming events

    • 16 Oct 2018
    • 7:30 PM
    • 04 Dec 2018
    • 9:00 PM
    • 3660 Stoneridge Rd., Suite D-102, Austin 78746
    Register

    Austin Society for Psychoanalytic Psychology (ASPP)

    A local chapter of the Division of Psychoanalysis (Division 39) of the American Psychological Association (APA)

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    Royal Routes to the Patient’s Unconscious

    A Salon (Study Group) Facilitated by

    JoAnn Ponder, PhD

    7 Tuesday evenings    October 16, 23, 30, November 6, 13, 27, December 4, 2018

    7:30 – 9:00 p.m.

    JoAnn’s Office: 3660 Stoneridge Rd., Ste. D-102, Austin, Texas  78746

    The premise of unconscious motivation is one of the defining features of psychoanalytic theory and practice. While Sigmund Freud considered dreams to be the royal road to the unconscious, he designated other routes as well, including free association, jokes, slips of the tongue, and transference. After considering these alternate routes in clinical work, we will delve into the topic of dreams, beginning with a review of various schools of dream interpretation. Together, we will ponder why contemporary relational psychoanalyst, Mark Blechner, described the dream as the answer to a question yet to be asked. This is an intermediate-level salon for clinicians, who are encouraged to bring their clinical cases into the discussion. We will utilize readings from classic and contemporary texts and journals. Salon participants must obtain their own copies of Blechner’s book, The Dream Frontier; other readings are provided.  Participants must attend all 7 sessions to get CE credit. Email joannponder@aim.com if you have questions about the salon and for approval to register. To register, go to asppaustin@gmail.com.

    10.5 CE/CEU/Professional Development Credits in the topic of clinical practice

    • Division 39 is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Division 39 maintains responsibility for this program and its content. ASPP is also approved to provide CEUs to LPCs, LMSWs, and LMFTs.

    Schedule and Readings

    10/16  Class1: Free Association

    Malan, D. H. (1982). Individual psychotherapy and the science of psychodynamics. London: Butterworths. Chapter 3: Unconscious communication, pp. 16-23.

    Barratt, B. B. (2017). Opening to the otherwise: The discipline of listening and the necessity of free-association for psychoanalytic praxis. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 98: 39-53.


    10/23  Class 2: Jokes and Slips of the Tongue

    Levy, S. T. (1990). Principles of interpretation: Mastering clear and concise interventions in psychotherapy. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson. Chapter 2: The data for interpretations (free association, interpreting slips of the tongue, interpreting unconscious derivatives, dreams and fantasies). pp. 29-49.

    Yazmajian, R. V. (1965). Slips of the tongue. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 34: 413-419.

    Poland, W. S. (1992). An analyst’s slip of the tongue. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 61: 85-87.

    Newirth, J. (2006). Jokes and their relation to the unconscious. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 16: 557-571.

    Corbett, K. (2004). Cracking in. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 14: 457-474.

     

    10/30  Class 3: Transference

    Weiner, I. B. (1975). Principles of psychotherapy. New York: John Wiley & Sons. Chapter 10: The psychotherapy relationship: Transference, pp. 202-240.

    LaFarge, L. (2014). How and why unconscious fantasy and transference are the defining features of psychoanalytic practice. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 95: 1265-1278.

     

    11/6  Class 4: New Ways of Conceptualizing Dreams

    Blechner, M. J. (2014). The dream frontier. New York: Routledge. Chapter 1: The dream frontier; Chapter 2: The analysis and creation of dream meaning; Chapter 3: Secondary revision, tertiary revision, and beyond; Chapter 4: Who creates, has, remembers, tells, and interprets dreams? Pp. 3-48.

     

    11/13  Class 5: New Ways of Conceptualizing Dreams (cont’d.)

    Blechner, M. J. (2014). The dream frontier. New York: Routledge. Chapter 5: We never lie in our dreams; Chapter 6: Condensation and interobjects; Chapter 7: Oneiric Darwinism; Chapter 8: Dreams and the language of thought; pp. 49-104.

     

    11/27  Class 6: Clinical Work with Dreams

    Blechner, M. J. (2014). The dream frontier. New York: Routledge. Chapter 9: Vectors of dream interpretation; Chapter 10: How to analyze dreams: Fundamental principles; Chapter 11: How to analyze dreams: Special topics; Chapter 12: Homonyms and other wordplay in dreams; Chapter 13: Dream acts: Dreams in analysis as actions; Chapter 14: Dream symbols; pp. 105-176.

    12/4  Class7: Clinical Work with Dreams (cont’d.)

    Blechner, M. J. (2014). The dream frontier. New York: Routledge. Chapter 15: Kleinian positions and dreams; Chapter 16: The patient’s dreams and the countertransference; Chapter 17: Dreams as supervision, dreams in supervision; Chapter 18: The clinical use of countertransference dreams; Chapter 19: The reallocation of madness; pp. 177-236.  

    Learning Objectives 

    After attending the program in its entirety, attendees will be able to:

    1a) Define free association and the psychological mechanisms underlying it

    1b) Give an example of a patient’s chain of associations and a possible conclusion about its unconscious meaning

    2a) Describe how Freud’s concept of “joke-work” is parallel to “dream-work” in terms of its underlying psychological mechanisms

    2b) Explain the value of considering the associative chains of the consciously intended word in a slip of the tongue as well as the unintended substituted word in accessing the patient’s unconscious fantasy

    3a) Define transference and describe what it can reveal about the patient

    3b) List 3 important considerations in deciding if and when to interpret the patient’s transference

    3c) Give an example of an interpretive sequence aimed at transference

    4a) Describe the importance of dreams in psychoanalysis and state why they must be processed with others to really understand them

    4b) Differentiate the dream from its subsequent revisions, and describe why the telling of the dream blurs the boundaries between the dream and its interpretation

    5a) Distinguish between manifest and latent dream content

    5b) Define Freud’s concept of “dream-work” and explain at least 2 transformative operations by which the mind converts latent dream thought into the manifest dream

    6a) Describe 3 avenues for association of a dream’s content

    6b) State why dreams might be considered as action in psychoanalysis

    6c) Describe 2 considerations in discerning the symbolism in a dream

    7a) Describe a way in which dreams might be used as supervision

    7b) Give an example of the clinical use of countertransference dreams  

    JoAnn Ponder, PhD is a psychologist-psychoanalyst in private practice in Austin. She is a graduate and faculty member of the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies (CFPS) in Houston. She also completed postgraduate training programs in infant-parent mental health intervention, object relational couples and family therapy, and psychoanalytic writing. JoAnn has presented at national and international conferences on a variety of topics. She co-edited a book about women’s issues, authored book chapters about the psychological process of becoming an adoptive mother and treating children who lost their mothers, and wrote journal articles about the intergenerational transmission of trauma, collective trauma following the Tower shootings in Austin, psychological defenses against global warming, and patients’ displacement of their issues onto animals.

    Continuing Education            

    10.5 CE/CEU/Professional Development credits if the salon is attended in its entirety

    CEs: This program, when attended in its entirety is available for 10.5 continuing education credits. Division 39 is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Division 39 maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Participants must attend 100% of the program in order to receive a Certificate of Attendance. Division 39 is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in its continuing education activities. Division 39 is also committed to conducting all activities in conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program.  If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods.  If participants have special needs, we will attempt to accommodate them.  Please address questions, concerns and any complaints to Randy Frazier at asppaustin@gmail.com. There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest. During the program, the presenter will discuss the validity and utility of the content and associated materials, the basis of such statements about validity/utility, and the limitations of and risks (severe and most common) associated with the content, if any. The program also provides 10.5 Professional Development credits for psychologists in Texas.

    ASPP is approved by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors (Provider # 1138) to provide continuing education for licensed professional counselors in Texas. ASPP is approved by the Texas State Board of Social Workers Examiners (Provider # 5501) to provide continuing education activities for social workers.

    Salon Coordinator: Randy Frazier, PhD, ASPP Co-President

    Contact the ASPP Administrator, Beth Martinez, at info@asppaustin.org with questions 


    • 05 Dec 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    • 3411 E. 5th Street, Austin 78702 Cloud Tree Studios and Gallery


    • 02 Jan 2019
    • 7:15 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Austin Energy Building at 721 Barton Springs Rd. Austin
    • 06 Feb 2019
    • 7:15 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Austin Energy Building at 721 Barton Springs Rd. Austin


    • 07 Feb 2019
    • 7:00 PM
    • 28 Mar 2019
    • 9:00 PM
    • 1612 Astor Place, Austin 78721
    Register

    Interpretation of Dreams: Exploring the Symbols of the Unconscious

    A Salon facilitated by Tara Chivukula, LCSW

    Image result for dreams in art

    Thursdays, February 7, 14, 21, 28, March 7, 14, 21, 28, 2019 from 7:00pm - 9:00pm

    Dream Exploration and interpretation has been a central tenet of psychoanalytic tradition since Freud's seminal work, The Interpretation of Dreams (1899). In this salon, we consider Freud's formative influence on the role dreams play in psychoanalysis, along with the contributions of contemporary analysts Montague Ullman, Mark Blechner, and Lou Aron. Using Ullman's experiential dreams processing technique, each member will bring in a dream to interpret.  We will gain understanding into the symbols and content that manifest in dreams, along with proficiency in working with dreams in the clinical setting. Please join us for an evocative and stimulating salon as we journey down the royal road to the unconscious. 

    Learning objectives: 

    1. Utilize Ullman's Dream Process to interpret and understand latent and manifest content of dreams.

    2. Learn how to utilize dream work in clinical practice.

    3. Utilize dream work to understand transference, resistance, introductory sessions, and termination

    References: 

    Aron, L (1989). Dreams, narrative and the psychoanalytic method. Contemporary Psychoanalysis. 25: 108 – 127.

    Blechner, M. (2001). The Dreams Frontier. NJ: The Analytic Press.

    Freud, S. (1900) Chapter VI. The Dream Work. Pgs. 311-344. The Interpretation of Dreams.

    Freud, S. (1917) The manifest and latent content of dreams and latent thoughts. Lecture VII. Pgs. 138-153. Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis.

    Ullman, M. (1984). Group Dream Work and Healing. Contemporary Psychoanalysis. 20: 120-130

    Bio: Tara Chivukula, LCSW is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist in Austin, TX. Tara specializes in work with individuals around issues of culture, race, identity, transition, and intergenerational trauma. She is a graduate of Columbia University School of Social Work and completed analytic training at the Manhattan Institute for Psychoanalysis, Inc. in New York City. Tara is currently the Division 39, Section IV local chapter representative. She is in private practice in Austin, TX. 

    • 06 Mar 2019
    • 7:15 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Austin Energy Building at 721 Barton Springs Rd.


    • 30 Mar 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • TBD

    REGISTRATION OPENING SOON

    Austin Society for Psychoanalytic Psychology (ASPP), A local chapter of the Division of Psychoanalysis (Division 39) of the American Psychological Association (APA) & Center for Psychoanalytic Studies (CFPS), A center affiliated with the American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA) present:

    2019 Clinical Conference

    The Use of One’s Unconscious as an Instrument of the Analysis


    with Lawrence Brown, PhD: Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute

    We will explore three pathways for representing the analyst’s unconscious experience in the here-and-now of the clinical hour: reveries, countertransference dreams and joke-work. The author terms these three activities spontaneous unconscious constructions.  These appear unbidden in the analyst’s mind during the session and signal the analyst’s unconscious work to give meaning to the emotions that arise within the context of the unconscious intersubjective field of the moment.  Clinical material from the analysis of an adult man is presented to illustrate the analyst’s use of a joke, a reverie and a countertransference dream as three modalities that unconsciously represent the emotions alive in the analytic encounter.


    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    1. Participants will understand the common processes involved in the spontaneous formation of dreams, jokes and reveries.
    2. Participants will learn the clinical applications of the three pathways to representing the analyst’s unconscious experience in the clinical hour.

     BIBLIOGRAPHY:

    Ogden, T. (2004) This art of psychoanalysis: Dreaming undreamt dreams and interrupted cries.IJP, 85: 857-877.

    Brown, L. J. (2007) On dreaming one’s patient: Reflections on an aspect of countertransference dreams.  Psa Q, 76: 835-861.

    Ferro, A. (2009) Transformations in Dreaming and Characters in the Psychoanalytic Field,. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 90:209-230


    Division 39 is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Division 39 maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CME: These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. APsaA is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. APsaA designates these live activities for a maximum of 13.5 AMA PRA Category I credits. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE: None of the planners or the presenter of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships or conflicts of interest to disclose.  ASPP is approved by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors (Provider # 1138) to provide continuing education for licensed professional counselors in Texas. ASPP is approved by the Texas State Board of Social Workers Examiners (Provider # 5501) to provide continuing education for social workers  and the Texas State Board of Examiners of Marriage and Family Therapists (Provider #1138).

    • 03 Apr 2019
    • 7:15 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Austin Energy Building at 721 Barton Springs Rd. Austin

    April Monthly Meeting

    • 27 Apr 2019
    • TBA

    REGISTRATION COMING SOON

    Sara Ahmed observes that recognition “produces rather than simply finds its object,” in other words, the techniques of psychoanalytic engagement produce the patients we can recognize. This leaves psychoanalysts attempting to witness and recognize trauma and violence with tools that may themselves re-inscribe violence to their patients. Using case material, this presentation explores the use of animals  - the patient’s kitten, not a therapeutic support animal - to attempt to response-ably witness and interrupt transgenerational violence. While Harold Searles in 1960 urged psychoanalysis to incorporate animals and the nonhuman environment within the clinical space, most psychoanalytic theory has ignored the integral role of animals in human lives. This case situates a kitten at the center of a racist enactment between the white therapist and a Latina-identified patient.  In this case, the kitten became an important actor and participant, engaging the patient to interrupt potential transgenerational patterns of violence. Integrating Searles’ conflicting ideas with current work on the nonhuman within cultural studies, this presentation will explore the ambivalent dependence of the human on the nonhuman, the co-emergence of these categories and subjectivities, and ways to consciously link these areas of experiencing in our clinical and theoretical work in ways that can open up space for response-able forms of witnessing and recognition.

    Learning Objectives:

    1)  Participants will be able to reconsider the roles of the nonhuman, including animals, in clinical work

    2) Participants will be able to conceptualize transgenerational racial trauma as it manifests in the clinical space

    3) Participants will be able to expand ideas of witnessing and how it can function in the clinical space

    References:

    Apprey, M. (2003). Repairing history: Reworking transgenerational trauma. In D. Moss (ed.) Hating in the first person plural: Psychoanalytic essays on racism, homophobia, misogyny and terror, pp. 3-28. New York: Other Press.

    Boulanger, G. (2012). Psychoanalytic witnessing: Professional obligation or moral imperative? Psychoanalytic Psychology, 29(3): 318-324.

    Moss, D. (Ed.) (2003) Hating in the First Person Plural. London: Other Press.

    Roth, M.S. (2012). Memory, trauma, and history: Essays on living with the past. NYC: Columbia University Press.

    Searles, H. (1960). The nonhuman environment in normal development and in

    schizophrenia. New York: International Universities Press.

    Bio: Katie Gentile, Ph.D. is Professor of Gender Studies and Chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (City University of New York). She is the author of Creating bodies: Eating disorders as self-destructive survival and the 2017 Gradiva Award winning The Business of being made: The temporalities of reproductive technologies, in psychoanalysis and cultures, both from Routledge. She is the editor of the Routledge book series Genders & Sexualities in Minds & Culture and a co-editor of the journal Studies in Gender and Sexuality. She has published most recently on restorative and community-based justice and institutional betrayal around sexual misconduct and the cultural and psychic production of temporalities around reproduction,  fetal personhood, and the nonhuman. She is on the faculty of New York University’s Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and the Critical Social Psychology program at the CUNY Graduate Center. She is in private practice in New York City.

    Division 39 is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Division 39 maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CME: These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. APsaA is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. APsaA designates these live activities for a maximum of 13.5 AMA PRA Category I credits. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE: None of the planners or the presenter of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships or conflicts of interest to disclose.  ASPP is approved by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors (Provider # 1138) to provide continuing education for licensed professional counselors in Texas. ASPP is approved by the Texas State Board of Social Workers Examiners (Provider # 5501) to provide continuing education for social workers and the Texas State Board of Examiners of Marriage and Family Therapists (Provider #1138).



    • 01 May 2019
    • 7:15 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Austin Energy Building at 721 Barton Springs Road, Austin


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